Minimal design lovers will love these homes

Whether it be in architecture, interior design, product development, web/graphics or a lifestyle, the minimal movement shows no sign of slowing down. In the midst of worldwide political uncertainty and rising stress levels, it’s no surprise that the clean lines, simple forms and calming white spaces associated with minimal design have resonated with people.

The minimal design principles used in the following 5 homes fill us with glee and envy in equal measure.

Okinawa Holiday Home

Minimal - Okinawa House captured by photgraphers Nacasa & Partners Minimal - Interior details of Okinawa House captured by photgraphers Nacasa & Partners

Designed by John Pawson as a seasonal getaway for his Tokyo based clients, this Okinawa holiday home is a reflection of Pawson’s passionate exploration of minimalist fundamentals. The residence consists of 3 tiered blocks and features angled glazed walls that curve towards a breathtaking ocean view. For the interior, London based John Pawson Architects utilised white walls, locally sourced limestone, polished marble and contrasting oak to create a calm, tranquil retreat from the hustle and bustle of Japan’s capital.

Read more about the Okinawa Residence at John Pawson Architects
Photography by Nacasa & Partners

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Meier House

Minimal - Richard Meier Home photographed by Simon Upton Minimal - Richard Meier Home photographed by Simon Upton & Hufton + Crow

A woodland hill in the southern English countryside. This is the location for Richard Meier’s minimal masterpiece. The placement of the structure draws its inspiration from traditional British manor houses, often set on the highest part of the hillside. Externally and internally, a dominate use of white creates a contrast with the vivid colour of the surrounding greenery, while warmth is added through the introduction of hickory flooring.

Read more about the property at Richard Meier & Partners Architects LLP
Photography by Hufton + Crow & Simon Upton

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Allen Key House

Minimal - Allen Key House in Australia photographed by Chris Warnes Minimal - Allen Key House in Australia photographed by Chris Warnes

With a tight budget and some clever thinking, Architect Prineas were able to create a light filled, expansive space in this 1930’s Californian bungalow renovation. Manipulation of the roof allowed for the introduction of large dormer windows that act to draw in views of surrounding trees in the leafy Australian suburb. A link between the original bungalow and the rear extension, creating two internal courtyards that promoto sunlight and airflow through this bright, modern space.

Read more about the property at Architect Prineas
Photography by Chris Warnes

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Elwood Townhouse

Minimal - Elwood Townhouse photographed by Derek Swalwell Minimal - Elwood Townhouse photographed by Derek Swalwell

Created by InForm, this minimal townhouse includes several notable defining features. The first being a concrete party wall that extends the length of the property, visually connecting the entrance to the sun washed rear courtyard. A large American oak staircase acts as a central focus and light source. On the ground floor ‘Elwood’ is fitted with an open plan kitchen and dining area that features a 3 metre long Calacatta marble worktop, oak floorboards and white-smoked walls. If the residence wasn’t zen enough, the master bedroom upstairs is joined by an in-house yoga studio.

Read more about the property at InForm Design
Photography by Derek Swalwell

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Plywood Home

Minimal - Islington Maisonette by Larissa Johnston Architect, photograph by Rory Gardiner Minimal - Islington Maisonette by Larissa Johnston Architect, photograph by Rory Gardiner

Reconfigured and extended by London-based architect Larissa Johnston, this Islington Maisonette caught my attention in a recent Dezeen article. Plywood, stainless steel, polished concrete, white plaster and an abundance of natural light help transform this once dark and segmented property into a light and spacious modern family home. A full length, ceiling height window opens the rear garden and allows for light to fill the open plan main living space. “The restrained nature of the material palette is designed to complement the simplicity of the spaces”

Read more about the property at Larissa Johnston Architect
Photography by Rory Gardiner

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Could you see yourself living in any of these homes? Drop us a comment and let us know!

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